Understanding the challenges of teacher recruitment and retention for ‘educationally isolated’ schools in England

Ovenden-Hope, Tanya and Passy, Rowena (2020) Understanding the challenges of teacher recruitment and retention for ‘educationally isolated’ schools in England. In: Exploring Teacher Recruitment and Retention: Contextual Challenges and International Perspectives. Routledge, Taylor & Francis, London. ISBN 9780429460623 (In Press)

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Abstract

In this chapter we use the concept of ‘educational isolation’ to develop an understanding of the place-based contextual school challenges of teacher recruitment and retention in England. We start the chapter with a discussion of our research underpinning the conceptualisation and resulting definition of educational isolation. We suggest that, in England, educationally isolated schools are typically coastal and rural in location, and should be defined as ‘schools experiencing limited access to resources for school improvement, resulting from challenges of school location’. We explore the specific issues that leaders of educationally isolated schools have with teacher recruitment and retention. Key challenges include: reduced local infrastructure caused by geographical remoteness, such as high and low housing costs; poor / no public transport, making these areas unattractive or untenable for potential employees (low recruitment); socio-economic deprivation creating greater challenges for school improvement, leading to high levels of staff churn (low retention); and cultural isolation with few / no other schools within the area to provide opportunities for different employment, resulting in a lack of staff churn (high retention). We conclude the chapter by identifying how Ofsted and other educational stakeholders are now considering the place-based contextual issues of educational isolation in school performance and by sharing recommendations aimed at bringing greater equity for educationally isolated schools in recruiting and retaining teachers.

Item Type: Book Section
Additional Information: This book is due for publication on 02/10/2020
Depositing User: Ms Raisa Burton
Date Deposited: 28 May 2020 10:34
Last Modified: 28 May 2020 10:34
URI: http://marjon.repository.guildhe.ac.uk/id/eprint/17552

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